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So, you’ve only got a month to study for the SAT. But is it enough to score a 1500+ on the exam? It surely is not a lot of time, but it can be enough if you strategise this month wisely.

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It’s recommended that you start preparing for the SAT at least 3 months before taking the exam, but if you’ve got only 30 days, don’t freak out! Here’s what your 30-day SAT study plan should look like.

IN THIS BLOG:

1.    SAT Study Calendar
2.    Beginning SAT prep
3.    Taking SAT practice tests
4.    Balancing your SAT score
5.    A Stellar SAT Study Plan

SAT Study Calendar

With just 30 days for SAT prep, you do not have a day to waste. A study calendar makes your SAT prep more manageable and directional, telling you exactly what to study each day. Without a calendar, you might lose track of what and how much you’ve studied and what you should pick up next. A calendar would help you keep a tab on your SAT preparation.

Before diving deep into your SAT prep, ensure your study calendar is in place for an organised and well-managed prep. When planning your study calendar, be realistic. High school is a busy time with regular classes, homework, extracurricular activities, and other obligations. You would want to design a SAT study calendar that, in the first place, is doable and fits well with your schedule.

Budget ample time for sectional and full-length mock tests for each section of the SAT – Reading, Writing, Maths with and without a calculator. Ensure you are not neglecting a section while focusing too much on another one. With the right resources, consistency, and a solid action plan, you have a good chance of acing the SAT.

Beginning SAT prep

Assess your current skill level and basic score during the first week of your SAT prep. Take a full-length Diagnostic SAT practice test to identify your weak and strong areas. This Diagnostic Test will give you an idea of how far you are from your target score.

After taking the practice test, review it thoroughly. Analyse your performance in each section and identify the ones you performed better in. For the questions you answered incorrectly, identify where you went wrong and for the questions you got right, see whether there’s room to solve those questions more efficiently.

The SAT practice test will also help you identify areas of strong opportunities. For instance, if you answered most of the Math questions on Geometry correctly, you should not spend too much time on basic geometrical concepts but focus on advanced strategies to solve the questions more efficiently. On the other hand, you’ll want to flag a topic for conceptual review if you answered most of the questions incorrectly for that topic. You should then build on your areas of improvement and continue taking more full-length practice tests to gauge your conceptual clarity and score improvement.

Taking SAT practice tests

Besides familiarising you with the SAT structure, mock tests help you build the endurance required to sit for a three-hour-long test. Mock tests are also a great way to build the speed and efficiency needed to solve the questions accurately.

Practising the questions will help you eliminate the wrong answers based on reason and not just intuition. Attempting and reviewing multiple full-length practice tests will improve your performance with each practice test.

Jamboree’s practice tests are the next best thing you can get to an actual SAT exam. We offer a SAT-prep series with 30+ tests to give you the maximum benefit from taking multiple mock tests. You can take a mock test UNLIMITED times cause we do not put a cap on practising!

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Balancing your SAT score

To get a 1500+ SAT score doesn’t mean you have to answer all the questions correctly. Studying smartly and playing to your strengths will help you get 1500+ on your SAT. For instance, you need at least 55 out of 58 questions correct in the Maths section, 41 out of 44 in the Writing & Language section, and 48 out of 52 in the Reading section to score a 1500+ on your SAT.

This combination is just an example of the number of questions you need to answer correctly to score above 1500. You can sketch out your combination of questions based on your strong areas. If you are a Math wizard but your Verbal isn’t that strong, then target that perfect 800 on the Maths section. With just a month for SAT prep, you may compromise a little on the Verbal section. On the other hand, if you are a Verbal pro, you can do vice versa.

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A Stellar SAT Study Plan

A ‘Stellar Study Plan’ is the answer to how to ace the SAT with 1500+ in 30 days – a clear plan of action that sets you on the right track. A study plan is a targeted, thoughtful approach that helps you understand the weekly milestone you must achieve.

Our experts have crafted a tried and tested SAT study plan, which can act as a blueprint of what your week-to-week preparation should look like. Depending on the number of days you have before the test, you can relax or squeeze in the hours in your study plan.

With the right resources, consistency, and a solid plan of action, you might have a good chance of acing the SAT in a month. Here is a printable PDF of what your SAT prep should look like.

SAT Study Plan

Studying for the SAT in a month, though challenging, can be feasible depending on the number of hours you can dedicate to the test prep.

Note: This article talks about a self-guided SAT study plan. Those who’d prefer expert help should take advantage of our SAT expert tutors.

With complete 1600s on their SATs, Jamboree students have landed at top universities across the world. Whether you have a month or three months for your SAT, we have a batch for you. With Jamboree, you can get SAT ready in just 4 weeks. Book a free fifteen-minute session and talk with our SAT expert for batch schedules and test prep.

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